Hallingbury Hall | A leading horse riding training centre in the UK
Hallingbury Hall | A leading horse riding training centre in the UK
Hallingbury Hall | A leading horse riding training centre in the UK
Hallingbury Hall | A leading horse riding training centre in the UK


Welcome to our home

We are one of the leading horse riding training centres in the UK. Regardless of whether you are an absolute beginner or an experienced rider, our ethos remains the same. At Hallingbury Hall Equestrian Centre we pride ourselves on running a professional and happy yard, offering a teaching system where both horses and humans are praised for good work resulting in a positive and highly motivating learning environment.

PHILOSOPHY

The training philosophy held by Hallingbury Hall is simple, we strive to empower our customers by providing them with the necessary tool set to improve their riding performance and set them up for success. Riders and horses need to love the sport. We encourage a β€˜can do’ mentality, urging riders not to dwell on their mistakes but rather to join together all the good elements and focus that energy on a positive outcome. Plus to enjoy themselves!

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OUR TEAM

Providing expert tuition to riders at all levels
Sally Hardwick

Sally Hardwick

Sally is the driving force behind Hallingbury Hall and works alongside her daughter Alex running the overall business operation as well as actively teaching. She has qualified and successfully competed in eight National Dressage Championships. Sally is a listed dressage judge and an international dressage trainer. She has three competition horses who are all competing at PSG and above. Sally has her BHSI (SM) and is trained by Carl Hester.
Alex Hardwick

Alex Hardwick

Alex lives, breathes and sleeps horses! Having been around them all her life, she couldn’t imagine doing anything else! Alex plays a key role in running the family stable/training yard at Hallingbury Hall and is involved in all aspects of the yard: caring for the horses, teaching customers, training staff and creating a happy environment for everyone. Alex teaches a wide variety of pupils, from children to adults, from beginners to advanced levels and always strives to help them achieve their goals. As a highly accomplished dressage rider, Alex has been selected to compete internationally for Great Britain over twenty times. She has won nine international titles and two National titles. In 2015 Alex and Donauvein were ranked fifth in the FEI world rankings for Under 25 Grand Prix riders. Track Alex’s journey in her bid to represent Team GB at a future Olympics by following her on Facebook.

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4 hours ago

Hallingbury Hall Equestrian Centre

Fun Christmas party!
Alexx Hardwick
...

 

Comment on Facebook

Looks like a good time was had by all !!

Gorgeous girls and boys!! Looking fabulous! Hope you all had a great night and aren’t paying for it too much today πŸ˜†

You all look beautiful x

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3 days ago

Hallingbury Hall Equestrian Centre

Winner winner chicken dinner πŸŒˆπŸ€Έβ€β™‚οΈ

Alex Hardwick
Big Cheese only went and won the Grand Prix 😝 at Keysoe High Profile πŸŽ‰πŸŽ‰ So so proud of him! He really tried his hardest. 10 years of hard work we have put in together and to have the feeling of him being so much more confident, relaxed and willing meant everything. Big big thank you to my mum and dad for helping in so many many ways, to my super sponsors who are so supportive and especially to Cheesy 😍 Hallingbury Hall Equestrian Centre PIKEUR Eskadron Shaws Equestrian Westleighs Saddlery & Country Clothing ltd Stübben Stübben UK & Ireland Saracen Horse Feeds Laura Payne Sports Therapy Hawkins Organic Quick Knot UK
...

 

Comment on Facebook

Looks amazing and loving all the Christmas decor πŸ’•πŸŽ„

Beautiful.

Looking fabulous ❀️❀️ x

Gorgeous horse. πŸ’•πŸ’•

Congrats on the win

Fantastic πŸ‘ŒπŸ‘ŒπŸ‘Œxxx

Lovely relaxed test. Lovely relaxed horse. And all your own work. Congratulations Alex!

Paddin Parker-Gilbert do you remember helping this lady with her boots πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ€£πŸ€£πŸ€£

Fantastic xxx

Wow lovely.X

Fantastic! Well done from us all here at Andrews Bowen πŸŽŠπŸ‘

Come and ride Fame for me!!

What a super star ⭐️ πŸ’πŸ’–πŸ‘πŸ‘πŸ‘

Yass !!! πŸ₯‚πŸ₯‚πŸ₯‚πŸ₯‚

Wow! Fabulous πŸ‘πŸ‘πŸ‘πŸ‘πŸ‘πŸ‘

Well done Alex, he looks lovely. Xx

Well done! Amazing hard work and dedication! πŸ’ͺ🐴

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1 week ago

Hallingbury Hall Equestrian Centre

Happy Sunday’s
Twenty years difference πŸ˜€πŸ˜€πŸ˜€
and still blessed .... a life time with horses πŸŒˆπŸ¦„
Alex Hardwick
...

Happy Sunday’s
Twenty years difference πŸ˜€πŸ˜€πŸ˜€
and still blessed .... a life time with horses πŸŒˆπŸ¦„
Alex HardwickImage attachment

 

Comment on Facebook

Love it! So many memories xxx

Lovely ❀️❀️

This is so lovely x

Memories πŸ’•πŸ’

Such a lovely photo Alexx Hardwick you look adorable when you were little. You 3 haven't changed a bit love going there and being taught by everyone lovely horses and ponies too. X Sally Hardwick and Simon John Hardwick you both have a very special daughter.x

😍😍😍

Lovely family picture Sally, proud parents I’m sure x

Fab photo xx

Great photo😍

I remember Honey and my time with you like it was yesterday.....and now I have two children of my own, both enjoying their special ponies....wonderful memories πŸ’–πŸ΄

Simply lovely x

Arrh Sally you are so lucky Alex is still riding , a total credit to you x

I rember them, i loved my time there i learned to ride there when i was 8yrs old i left when i was about 15/16yrs old i then went on to have 3 of my own horses but had a accident so lost confidence and then it all got way too expensive for me but i will always rember my time here, thank you sally and your team back then for giving me such lovely memaries of the joy of riding i miss it so very much but hey every chapter comes to an end but thankyou so much for it being a good happy positive one for me xx

How fantastic πŸ˜€πŸ˜€

πŸ€—

How wonderful πŸ’—πŸ’—πŸ’— glad you’re wearing a hat now Sally!!! πŸ˜„πŸ˜„ xxxx

Beautiful pictures! r.i.p 3 amazing horses AND riders who have influenced so so many ! Its so nice seeing honey in her younger days aswell! X

What a beautiful comparison xx

Love this ❀️❀️❀️❀️❀️❀️

So I left in 1993 and I'm not sure if I knew those 3 in the older picture??Xx

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2 weeks ago

Hallingbury Hall Equestrian Centre

Really interesting...... πŸ€“This is an absolute must read for every horse owner and especially those with younger horses! People can certainly debate and argue over different training techniques and styles but we can not argue the science. "Owners and trainers need to realize there's a definite, easy-to-remember schedule of fusion - and then make their decision as to when to ride the horse based on that rather than on the external appearance of the horse. For there are some breeds of horse - the Quarter Horse is the premier among these - which have been bred in such a manner as to LOOK mature long before they actually ARE mature. This puts these horses in jeopardy from people who are either ignorant of the closure schedule, or more interested in their own schedule (for futurities or other competitions) than they are in the welfare of the animal. The process of fusion goes from the bottom up. In other words, the lower down toward the hoofs you look, the earlier the growth plates will have fused; and the higher up toward the animal's back you look, the later. The growth plate at the top of the coffin bone (the most distal bone of the limb) is fused at birth. What this means is that the coffin bones get no TALLER after birth (they get much larger around, though, by another mechanism). That's the first one. In order after that: 2. Short pastern - top & bottom between birth and 6 mos. 3. Long pastern - top & bottom between 6 mos. And 1 yr. 4. Cannon bone - top & bottom between 8 mos. And 1.5 yrs. 5. Small bones of knee - top & bottom on each, between 1.5 and 2.5 yrs. 6. Bottom of radius-ulna - between 2 and 2.5 yrs. 7. Weight-bearing portion of glenoid notch at top of radius - between 2.5 and 3 yrs. 8. Humerus - top & bottom, between 3 and 3.5 yrs. 9. Scapula - glenoid or bottom (weight-bearing) portion - between 3.5 and 4 yrs. 10. Hindlimb - lower portions same as forelimb 11. Hock - this joint is "late" for as low down as it is; growth plates on the tibial & fibular tarsals don't fuse until the animal is four (so the hocks are a known "weak point" - even the 18th-century literature warns against driving young horses in plow or other deep or sticky footing, or jumping them up into a heavy load, for danger of spraining their hocks) 12. Tibia - top & bottom, between 2.5 and 3 yrs. 13. Femur - bottom, between 3 and 3.5 yrs.; neck, between 3.5 and 4 yrs.; major and 3rd trochanters, between 3 and 3.5 yrs. 14. Pelvis - growth plates on the points of hip, peak of croup (tubera sacrale), and points of buttock (tuber ischii), between 3 and 4 yrs. and what do you think is last? The vertebral column, of course. A normal horse has 32 vertebrae between the back of the skull and the root of the dock, and there are several growth plates on each one, the most important of which is the one capping the centrum. These do not fuse until the horse is at least 5 1/2 years old (and this figure applies to a small-sized, scrubby, range-raised mare. The taller your horse and the longer its neck, the later full fusion will occur. And for a male - is this a surprise? -- You add six months. So, for example, a 17-hand TB or Saddlebred or WB gelding may not be fully mature until his 8th year - something that owners of such individuals have often told me that they "suspected" ). The lateness of vertebral "closure" is most significant for two reasons. One: in no limb are there 32 growth plates! Two: The growth plates in the limbs are (more or less) oriented perpendicular to the stress of the load passing through them, while those of the vertebral chain are oriented parallel to weight placed upon the horse's back. Bottom line: you can sprain a horse's back (i.e., displace the vertebral growth plates) a lot more easily than you can sprain those located in the limbs. And here's another little fact: within the chain of vertebrae, the last to fully "close" are those at the base of the animal's neck (that's why the long-necked individual may go past 6 yrs. to achieve full maturity). So you also have to be careful - very careful - not to yank the neck around on your young horse, or get him in any situation where he strains his neck." Dr. Deb Bennett ABOUT DR. DEB: Deb Bennett, Ph.D., is a 1984 graduate of the University of Kansas, and until 1992 was with the Smithsonian Institution. She is known as an authority on the classification, evolution, anatomy, and biomechanics of fossil and living horses. Her research interests include the history of domestication and world bloodlines and breeds. She teaches unique anatomy short-courses and horsemanship clinics designed to be enjoyable to riders of all breeds and disciplines, and all levels of skill. Internationally known for her scientific approach to conformation analysis, "Dr. Deb" has made a career out of conveying a kind of "X-ray vision" for bone structure to breeders and buyers. Her background in biomechanics helps her clearly explain how conformation relates to performance ability. Dr. Deb's clinics often feature real bones and interesting biomechanical models. ...

Really interesting...... πŸ€“
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